Givology Staff's Blog

Top Ten Education Social Media Accounts to Follow Today

Social media has the power to connect people throughout the world who care about the same issues. Following these top ten social media accounts is a great first step to take to learn more about the power of education in developing countries.
1. Global Partnerships: "Without education, there is no progress, no development," says Salma Kikwete, First Lady of Tanzania. Follow [url=https://twitter.com/GPEducation]@GPforEducation[/url] on Twitter to learn about international efforts to improve education throughout the world and be inspired by world leaders taking initiative in spreading education.
2. Camfed: Camfed promotes education for girls as a path to economic stability for developing nations. Follow [url=https://twitter.com/Camfed]@Camfed[/url] to learn how investing in girls transforms social and economic situations in struggling areas of the world.
3. Literacy, Language, and Learning Initiative: The L3 Initiative is promoting literacy in Rwanda and posts about the successes of the program in teaching students and teachers alike to "embrace the culture of reading." Follow [url=https://twitter.com/L3_Initiative]@L3_Initiative[/url] to learn more about the well-researched reading programs that are successfully increasing literacy.
4. Musimbi Kanyoro: Kanyoro is the president and CEO of Global Fund for Women. Follow [url=https://twitter.com/GlobalFundWomen]@GlobalFundWomen[/url] to learn about female leaders standing up for gender equality and education for girls. Kanyoro is an activist who advocates for education and justice for women.
5. . A World at School: A World at School uses youth activism to advocate for change and to help the "58 million youth" who are out of school. Follow [url=https://twitter.com/aworldatschool]@aworldatschool[/url] to learn more about what youth are doing to speak up and support the right to an education that everyone deserves.
6. Innovations for Poverty Action: This nonprofit supports creative solutions for problems in impoverished populations. From new inventions and start-ups to break through research on what works in helping developing countries foster education and economic development, IPA shares the most recent ideas changing lives. Like [url=https://www.facebook.com/InnovationsforPovertyAction]Innovations for Poverty Action[/url] on Facebook to stay updated.
7. [url=https://www.facebook.com/pages/World-Bank-Education-Statistics/125875967433]World Bank Education Statistics[/url]: Like this UN group on Facebook for updates on research and statistics on education throughout the world. These numbers expose not only the disparities that exist between different countries, genders, and income levels of students, but also the positive trends occurring in leading developing nations that are striving for and reaching goals.
8. Taleem: "Taleem" means education in Urdu, the national language of Pakistan. Follow [url=https://twitter.com/TaleemO]@TaleemO[/url] to see how Pakistani educators and students are voicing their concerns regarding education in Pakistan. Facing limited resources, poor infrastructure, and unpaid salaries, teachers and students are fighting for stronger government support in Pakistan's system of education. Despite being criticized, people are voicing their opinions and the results are powerful.
9. WISER: Like [url=https://www.facebook.com/WISERGirlsKenya]WISER[/url] on Facebook to learn about personal stories of underprivileged African girls in a fishing village of rural Kenya. WISER is giving girls opportunities to educate themselves and avoid medical illness, sexually transmitted disease, child marriage, and child labor. The statistics and visuals communicate the chain reaction that happens when one person is educated and continues to contribute to future change in the region and in the lives of others.
10. UN GEFI: Follow [url=https://twitter.com/GlobalEduFirst]@GlobalEduFirst[/url] to keep updated on the UN Secretary General education initiative. Through 6 steps, the initiative has a goal of reforming education. By training teachers, improving assessment and curriculum, integrating classrooms into communities, providing needed learning supplies, and increasing funding in education. The Global Education First Initiative is using research and data to improve education practices through not only reaching more people, but improving the quality of learning.

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