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Updates

  • Partner Updates from Tea Leaf Trust

    Partner Tea Leaf Trust recently sent us updates, which we'd like to share with you all! Tea Leaf Trust is a UK registered charity that works in the tea estate areas of Sri Lanka, running two schools for 18 to 24 year olds in Maskeliya and Nuwara Eliya (both in Central Province). They focus on English language and professional development. However, they also do a lot of personal development work developing students’ coping mechanisms and emotional health in the face of complex social issues. Our partner organization has sent us images that give testimony to the facts of poverty and malnutrition in the tea estates:
  • Tea Leaf Trust: Providing Educational Opportunities in the Tea Estates

    Tea Leaf Trust has responded to the problems of poverty, malnutrition, and gender-based violence in the tea estates by providing life-changing opportunities to those who enroll in its schools:
  • Tea Leaf Trust: New Project

    [b] [/b] [b]Tea Leaf Trust's New "Counselling Support Project" [/b] The aim of this new project is to train two counsellors at each of our two school sites (im Sri Lanka's Central Province) for the next two years – 8 in total. This is to develop our counselling support in order to improve the emotional health and general wellbeing of our student body and community. [b]Project Description: [/b] Sri Lanka has the fourth highest suicide rate in the world (29/1000). Within Sri Lanka there are hot spots where the problem of suicide is particularly acute. Two major determiners are youth and those from the tea plantations. Tea Leaf Vision works with young people, from the tea plantations of Sri Lanka – a hot spot within a hot spot! We have two schools and 320 full-time students aged between 18 and 24 come and study with us every year. However, the communities within which these students live are tough with 80% alcoholism amongst the men, 83% domestic violence against wome...
  • Tea Leaf Trust: Project Update

    [b]Partner Report to Givology, October 2017[/b] [b]Who we are[/b] Tea Leaf Trust is a UK registered charity (No: 1123427). We work exclusively in the tea estate areas of Sri Lanka where we run two schools for 18 to 24 year olds in Maskeliya and Nuwara Eliya (both in Central Province). We are registered as a non-profiting making business in Sri Lanka – Tea Leaf Vision (Guarantee) Ltd. Our focus and expertise is English language and professional development. However, we also do a lot of personal development work developing students’ coping mechanisms and emotional health in the face of complex social issues. Around 80% of male tea estate workers are alcoholics, with 83% of women suffering from domestic violence. In a country that has the 4th highest suicide rate in the world, young people from the tea estates are particularly vulnerable. [b]What we do[/b] We opened our first school (TLV Maskeliya) in January 2010 and have recently started our second school in the hill country’s touris...
  • Partner Updates from Tea Leaf Trust

    [b]Tea Leaf Trust Updates, October 2017[/b] I imagine many of us have children or nieces and nephews. I’d like to ask you to picture them at school in a class of 20. Out of this number, think about how many live in homes where domestic violence is a regular occurrence – at our school, in any class, in any year this number would be at least 16 out of 20. There are 196 countries in the world. Sri Lanka has the 4th highest rate of suicide. Maskeliya, where we are based, is a hot spot within Sri Lanka. Finally, in a country where only 6.6% of the 20 million population live in extreme poverty, 80% of our students live on less than $1 a day. But it is not just the multi-layered social issues, or the grinding poverty… this is only half of the problem… it is also the poverty of hope. In a country where businesses operate in the English language, only 2 out of 25 English teachers in our local government schools can speak any English at all – so what hope is there? You see, the British brough...