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  • What Do You Know About Education Around The World?

    By: Yejide Obisesan No, really! What do you know? Take a quick moment to take our quiz below! [color=#339933] [url=http://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FW2252B]Try it Here![/url][/color] How did you do? Did you get them all right, a few, none? No matter how you did, it is interesting to see what we don't know about education systems around the world. There are basic similarities that prevail in education in general but every country employs its own structure greatly influenced by their culture. Lets take a look at some facts about education systems in the countries our field partners are from! [color=#009966][b]I n d i a[/b][/color] The Indian school system is one the biggest and most complicated in the world. China is the only one that matches it. With a population of 1.23 billion, you would certainly hope so! Their largest primary school has more than 32,000 students, the largest student population in the world. [u]Givology Partner[/u]: [color=#339900]Apne Aap[/color] [font=OpenSansR...
  • The Impact of Mother Involvement in Education

    Motherhood possesses the utmost importance in the nurturing of children. But it also provides the education and academic achievements of their children as students. According to a study conducted by professors at the University of Illinois, (link: [url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4235963/]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4235963/[/url]), certain behaviors by mothers in the early stages of a child’s life directly led to the latter student achievement and so too was earlier maternal participation in school- and education-related activities. Another study by Gail Zimmerman cited parental enthusiasm as an impactful factor in the succeeding of their children’s academic endeavors. It observed the data from a study of 193 Los Angeles area 2nd- and 5th-grade children and their mothers and attempted to form a relationship between parental involvement and academic standing. It found a clear and concise connection between the positive parental enthusiasm and a stud...
  • Happy Mothers Day from Givology!

    [b]Happy Mother’s Day from Givology! [/b] We are thankful for our mothers and all the ways in which they have inspired us. Here are a few touching stories that we have collected from our Givology team and network: “I would not have become the woman and mother I am today without the determination and sacrifice of my own mother. She fought for the family, pushing everything aside for my sister and I to get the best education we could afford. Just like the many Givology students who have similarly devoted mothers, I owe so much of where I am today and what inspired Givology.org's formation to my mother. Happy Mother's Day to everyone and remember that women truly lift communities, driving education and progress.” [b]-[/b][b]-Jennifer Chen, Givology Co-Founder and CEO[/b] “My mother is a Pharmacy leader who has worked in multiple hospitals managing and leading her teams to collective and individual success. But looking at all of her accolades you would never know the trials she ...
  • Impact Series Podcast: Neema Namadamu from Hero Women Rising & Synergy of Congolese Women Associations

    [url=http://www.herowomenrising.org/people]Source[/url] [font=OpenSansRegular, arial, sans-serif] [/font] [color=#339900][b]"when you speak out, you get solutions." [/b][/color] [url=https://ctt.ac/35hW8]CLICK TO TWEET[/url]! [color=#339900][b] [/b][/color]Guest: Neema Namadamu Hosted By: Yejide Obisesan [b][i][u]Subscribe and listen more of the [/u][url=https://soundcloud.com/givology]Givology Impact series here[/url]![/i][/b] For more [color=#339933]Givology[/color] follow us on: Twitter [url=https://twitter.com/Givology]@Givology[/url] Instagram [url=https://www.instagram.com/givology/?hl=en]@givology[/url] [i][color=#339900][b]Neema Namadamu [/b][/color]is the founder and executive director of [color=#339900]S[/color][color=#339900]AFECO Synergie of the Women’s Congolese Association[/color] which is an association of women and women-led NGOs who encourage and support one another in their work on Peace, Rights, and Development agendas that prioritize human rights and ri...
  • Disability and Inclusive Education in the Developing World

    by Brent Harlow The backdrop for many of the studies covered in this series (which looks at the best research to date on what works in education in the developing world) is the remarkable progress toward universal education that has been made in the developing world over the last three decades. Studies discussed in these posts have taken this progress as a common point of departure, and asked why this or that group— girls, the very poor, indigenous children, or children rural or war-torn areas— has not benefited equally from the revolution in education, and why these groups continue to have lower enrollment, attendance, and learning outcomes than their peers in the developing world. I have yet to mention in these posts, however, the group which has been most left behind and excluded from the benefits of recent policies designed to achieve universal education. Disability is responsible for a thirty percent attendance gap, making it more significant than the sex, socioeconomic status,...